What teaching teaches CEOs

Lifehacker recently published an article that particularly resonated with me: Six Things I Learned from Teaching That I Still Use in Everyday Life. The lessons I learned teaching for four years at Naval Nuclear Power School continue to help me to this day. The number one lesson that author Melanie Pinola cites is especially applicable for CEOs: Don’t Assume Another Person Understands What You’ve Said (or Did Not Say).

Book Launch Party Sept. 11 at Capital Factory

Fellow Austinites and those who may be in the Austin area on September 11: You are cordially invited to attend my book launch party at Capital Factory! We’ll be celebrating the publication of my first book, “The CEO Tightrope.” This book has been years in the making and is my attempt – based on my […]

Why CEOs suck and how to suck less

It’s part of my mission every day to address this topic via this blog, my upcoming book, my company Khorus, and in many other ways. It is also the title of my proposed session at SXSW Las Vegas, which is summarized below. Voting for which sessions will be held during the conference ends tomorrow, May 9, so […]

Are you better at relating to employees or setting performance targets?

Most leaders tend to be better at either building relationships with employees or setting strong performance requirements for them, but the best CEOs and managers do both equally well. This is the focus of my latest article for Forbes – The Critical Balance CEOs and Managers Must Strike To Get Results – where I provide […]

Why do so many companies want to fire their CEO? – CBS News

Why do so many companies want to fire their CEO? – CBS News

This is a great article written by Margaret Heffernan for CBS Moneywatch. She discusses how CEOs are not prepared for the role and therefore don’t know what to do when they achieve it (my mantra for this blog). As I’ve written about before, most CEOs have gotten the job because they were superstar performers in their careers, meaning they have specialized knowledge in marketing, sales, engineering or another function. But the CEO role entails a unique set of responsibilities. As Heffernan says, “But once they assume senior executive positions, they need entirely different skills: networking, knowledge-gathering, consensus building, listening. They should be good at this – so why aren’t they?”